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Fountain Tire relocates HQ

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Photo by Jess Smith, f2.8 photography Canadian crossfit athletes Peter Li, (foreground) and Richard Bodnaruk put on a show of strength at the June 19 Fountain Tire headquarters dedication by “flipping” earthmover tires, each weighing 274 pounds, over a 40-meter course.

EDMONTON, Alberta (June 20, 2014) — Fountain Tire has relocated its headquarters staff to a new corporate office in Edmonton, where it held a grand opening June 19, complete with earthmover tire “flipping” races.

Athletes from the city’s Crossfit Lazarus Gym came to the company’s new offices at Fountain Tire Place and showcased three 40-meter earthmover tire “flipping” races with commentary by Fountain Tire’s “bald guy” spokesperson Thom Sharp.

Following the races, the company donated $10,000 to the Edmonton branch of the Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society (STARS).

“Our decision to invest in Fountain Tire Place reflects Edmonton’s stature as a world-class home for business, and we are committed to basing our corporate office here for the long haul,” said Brent Hesje, Fountain Tire CEO.

The company credits the city’s “business-friendly climate” and robust post-secondary education infrastructure with playing an integral role in the company’s success, particularly in attracting and retaining high-quality employees.

The new office is located in The Village at Blackmud Creek, a commercial development in south Edmonton. Fountain Tire is leasing two floors of a three-story structure, covering 30,500 square feet.

The previous headquarters were sold. 

Fountain Tire employs 131 at its corporate office and operates 155 tire and automotive service stores in Western Canada and Ontario. A majority of the stores are 50-percent owned by the store managers.

The company was founded in 1956 in Wainwright, Alberta, by Bill Fountain and later settled in Edmonton.

 

 

 

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With the subject of Chinese-sourced tire garnering so much attention, do consumers really care about where their tires come from? How many of your customers ask about the origin of tires they’re buying?

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