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Frost: Inductive EV charging growing

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MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (June 9, 2014) — Inductive charging is being offered as an automotive aftermarket solution with attractive financing options, according to Frost & Sullivan Inc., but the cost of purchasing and installing an inductive charging solution is approximately 30-percent higher than that of conductive charging.

In its latest research report, Frost & Sullivan noted that automotive OEMs are partnering with participants from many different vertical markets in order to test the inductive charging products, which are expected to boost the inductive charging market for electric vehicles (EVs) by about 126 percent by 2020.

Frost & Sullivan’s latest research, “Strategic Analysis of Inductive Charging for Global Electric Vehicles (EV) Market,” determined that inductive charging will account for 1.2 percent of both public and residential charging in North America. Residential charging will account for more than 70 percent of the overall charging.

“OEMs such as Renault, Nissan, Daimler, Volvo, BMW and Toyota are working on the development of inductive charging for future EVs,” said Prajyot Sathe, Frost & Sullivan’s automotive and transportation senior research analyst, “and more than 10 auto makers have announced trial tests,

“As a result, inductive charging will soon be available in cars either as an additional feature or as an inbuilt feature.”

Inductive charging—also known as “wireless charging”—uses an electromagnetic field to transfer energy between two objects, usually with a charging station, according to an online source. Energy is sent through an inductive coupling to an electrical device, which can then use that energy to charge batteries or run the device.

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TB Reader Poll

Previous | Published January 28, 2016

Titan International and the United Steelworkers union have petitioned the U.S. International Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Commerce seeking relief from OTR tire imports from China, India and Sri Lanka. What’s your opinion?

I wholeheartedly support their action – something needs to be done.
46%
(36 votes)
I think it’s a bad idea that could inevitably tie the hands of domestic tire makers.
13%
(10 votes)
I oppose any duties against tire importers—they only raise costs for distributors and make it harder to obtain inventory.
24%
(19 votes)
I’m kind of on the fence and not sure what’s right, but need more information before deciding.
14%
(11 votes)
I don’t really care whether or not relief is granted.
3%
(2 votes)
Total votes: 78