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DENVER (June 6, 2014) — Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed a bill designed to clean up the state’s 60 million-plus stockpiled scrap tires.

 The bill, which Hickenlooper signed June 6, is the culmination of seven years of effort by the Rubber Manufacturers Association to enact legislation that would address Colorado’s two tire monofills, the largest in the U.S.

 “Colorado needs this legislation to end the stockpiling of waste tires, clean up the monofills and help establish new markets for discarded tires,” said RMA Vice President Michael Blumenthal, who led the effort to pass the bill.

 The bipartisan bill establishes a plan for closing and cleaning up the monofills; ends an inefficient taxpayer-funded subsidy program to end-users of scrap tires.

The Colorado monofills comprise more than half of the estimated 100 million stockpiled waste tires left in the U.S., according to the RMA. In 1990, when the association began its scrap tire abatement efforts, there were more than 1 billion stockpiled scrap tires in the U.S., the RMA said.

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The bill — THB 1352 — abolishes Colorado’s existing scrap tire laws and its waste tire advisory commission. It consolidates all responsibility for regulating tires to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. It expands the current $1.50 disposal fee on new passenger tire purchases to cover purchases of all tires, but reduces the fee to 55 cents per tire on Jan. 1, 2018.

Also on Jan. 1, 2018, the state’s end-users fund and waste tire market development fund will be abolished. On that date, all collected scrap tire fees will begin going to the waste tire administration, enforcement and cleanup fund.

The bill also sets stringent new requirements for tire storage by waste tire haulers and processors; forbids adding to the state’s waste tire monofill after Jan. 1, 2018; and closes the monofill permanently by July 1, 2024.

Among the initiatives to be funded via the fees collected will be the creation of a waste tire innovative technology business development, grant, loan and incentive-funding program to assist in creating waste tire business opportunities and jobs in the tire recycling sector.

The bipartisan legislation was sponsored by Reps. Max Tyler, D, District 23, and Don Coram, R, District 58, whom Mr. Blumenthal lauded for their hard work in "securing the needed support" for this legislation.

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Colo. gov. signs scrap tire bill

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Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment photo

DENVER (June 6, 2014) — Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed a bill designed to clean up the state’s 60 million-plus stockpiled scrap tires.

 The bill, which Hickenlooper signed June 6, is the culmination of seven years of effort by the Rubber Manufacturers Association to enact legislation that would address Colorado’s two tire monofills, the largest in the U.S.

 “Colorado needs this legislation to end the stockpiling of waste tires, clean up the monofills and help establish new markets for discarded tires,” said RMA Vice President Michael Blumenthal, who led the effort to pass the bill.

 The bipartisan bill establishes a plan for closing and cleaning up the monofills; ends an inefficient taxpayer-funded subsidy program to end-users of scrap tires.

The Colorado monofills comprise more than half of the estimated 100 million stockpiled waste tires left in the U.S., according to the RMA. In 1990, when the association began its scrap tire abatement efforts, there were more than 1 billion stockpiled scrap tires in the U.S., the RMA said.

Colorado Governor's Office photo Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper

The bill — THB 1352 — abolishes Colorado’s existing scrap tire laws and its waste tire advisory commission. It consolidates all responsibility for regulating tires to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. It expands the current $1.50 disposal fee on new passenger tire purchases to cover purchases of all tires, but reduces the fee to 55 cents per tire on Jan. 1, 2018.

Also on Jan. 1, 2018, the state’s end-users fund and waste tire market development fund will be abolished. On that date, all collected scrap tire fees will begin going to the waste tire administration, enforcement and cleanup fund.

The bill also sets stringent new requirements for tire storage by waste tire haulers and processors; forbids adding to the state’s waste tire monofill after Jan. 1, 2018; and closes the monofill permanently by July 1, 2024.

Among the initiatives to be funded via the fees collected will be the creation of a waste tire innovative technology business development, grant, loan and incentive-funding program to assist in creating waste tire business opportunities and jobs in the tire recycling sector.

The bipartisan legislation was sponsored by Reps. Max Tyler, D, District 23, and Don Coram, R, District 58, whom Mr. Blumenthal lauded for their hard work in "securing the needed support" for this legislation.

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TB Reader Poll

Previous | Published January 28, 2016

Titan International and the United Steelworkers union have petitioned the U.S. International Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Commerce seeking relief from OTR tire imports from China, India and Sri Lanka. What’s your opinion?

I wholeheartedly support their action – something needs to be done.
46%
(36 votes)
I think it’s a bad idea that could inevitably tie the hands of domestic tire makers.
13%
(10 votes)
I oppose any duties against tire importers—they only raise costs for distributors and make it harder to obtain inventory.
24%
(19 votes)
I’m kind of on the fence and not sure what’s right, but need more information before deciding.
14%
(11 votes)
I don’t really care whether or not relief is granted.
3%
(2 votes)
Total votes: 78