Current Issue

Aftermarket to grow 3.4% annually

Comments Email

BETHESDA, Md. (May 15, 2014) — The value of the U.S. automotive aftermarket is expected to grow 3.4 percent annually through 2017, according to a study produced jointly by the Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association (AASA) and the Auto Care Association (ACA).

The “2014 Joint Channel Forecast Model” predicts that aftermarket sales will grow to $273.4 billion in 2017 from $238.4 billion in 2013, an increase of $35 billion over the four-year period.

“The forecast model demonstrates that despite strong new vehicle sales, historic high gas prices and a flattening of miles driven, our industry is poised for steady growth,” said Kathleen Schmatz, ACA president and CEO. “Why? The average age of vehicles is 11.4 years, the oldest ever, and the age mix of vehicles continues to favor older vehicles, creating a robust sweet spot for service and repair.”

“The forecast model anticipates that growth in population, employment and income will lead to an increase in miles driven and the number of vehicles on the road resulting in long term aftermarket growth,” said Bill Long, AASA president and COO.

“The Channel Forecast Model is a tool to help participants achieve that growth despite some of the major market shifts facing our industry such as vehicle telematics, increasing vehicle technology, new-model introductions and parts proliferation.”

The report was conducted on behalf of the associations by IHS Automotive.

The Joint Channel Forecast Model is available for purchase at the AASA website, and in the Auto Care Association’s 2015 Digital Auto Care Factbook, available on its website.

More Polls>

TB Reader Poll

Previous | Published January 28, 2016

Titan International and the United Steelworkers union have petitioned the U.S. International Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Commerce seeking relief from OTR tire imports from China, India and Sri Lanka. What’s your opinion?

I wholeheartedly support their action – something needs to be done.
46%
(36 votes)
I think it’s a bad idea that could inevitably tie the hands of domestic tire makers.
13%
(10 votes)
I oppose any duties against tire importers—they only raise costs for distributors and make it harder to obtain inventory.
24%
(19 votes)
I’m kind of on the fence and not sure what’s right, but need more information before deciding.
14%
(11 votes)
I don’t really care whether or not relief is granted.
3%
(2 votes)
Total votes: 78