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Oregon DOT prepares studded snow tires study

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(Tire Rack photos)

SALEM, Ore. (Feb. 19, 2014) — The Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is preparing a study comparing the performance of studded and non-studded snow tires, according to the Oregon legislator who requested the study.

Officials of the Oregon DOT met Feb. 4 with Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ontario, vice-chair of Oregon's House Transportation & Economic Development Committee. The officials briefed Rep. Bentz on the focus and progress of the study, which is scheduled for release this fall.

Rep. Bentz was instrumental in preventing a proposed ban on studded tires from becoming law in Oregon, according to publicity from his office. Instead, the legislature asked the Oregon DOT to update its earlier study of studded tires, their efficacy in snow and their effect on the state's roads.

"Insight into the difference between advanced design, non-studded snow tires and snow tires with studs is important both for our personal safety and to make sure that when we buy those four studded snow tires for our car we are doing so for good reasons," Rep. Bentz said.

Oregon has 7,482.46 miles of highway, according to the state's website.

When the study is completed, the Oregon DOT plans to post it on its website.

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TB Reader Poll

Previous | Published January 28, 2016

Titan International and the United Steelworkers union have petitioned the U.S. International Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Commerce seeking relief from OTR tire imports from China, India and Sri Lanka. What’s your opinion?

I wholeheartedly support their action – something needs to be done.
46%
(36 votes)
I think it’s a bad idea that could inevitably tie the hands of domestic tire makers.
13%
(10 votes)
I oppose any duties against tire importers—they only raise costs for distributors and make it harder to obtain inventory.
24%
(19 votes)
I’m kind of on the fence and not sure what’s right, but need more information before deciding.
14%
(11 votes)
I don’t really care whether or not relief is granted.
3%
(2 votes)
Total votes: 78